11.28.2006

 

The evolution of video games



All of that evolution has occured in about 25 years. Robots will be evolving that quickly over the next 25 years.

Comments:
Amazing stuff. However, it's REALLY annoying how they use rendered cut-scenes and promos for the most recent games. They are not comparing like with like for the final transition.

BBB
 
I'm sure making a computer game is equally difficult to making an intelligent agent.
 
So wait, you mean after the move from 2D environments (rolling around on the floor) to 3D invironments (climbing, jumping, ect.) most advances in robots will do nothing but improve aesthetics?
 
BBB, are you sure they're pre-rendered?

For instance, Metal Gear Solid 3 footage is computed on the fly, and that the gave environment really is super-responsive.

They had to put a special note before they showed footage: "Yes, this really is all real-time. We didn't prerender this," because it was the sort of stuff that would have been pre-rendered, in the past.
 
Actually, the problems of making an intelligent agent are very similar to the problems of making a computer game.

Here are some areas of overlap: Environment simulation. (check.) Reasoners. (check: Outside of the insurance and medical reasoners, the most popular use of forward and reverse chaining reasoners is in video game AI.) Multi-agent, multi-strategy communication systems. (check) Human-computer interface. (check) Context recognition. (check)

Games are, in many ways, the optimal place for testing AIs, building AIs, and so on.

It's sort of like Chess (which, incidentally: a game,) which has enough explosiveness of possibility, within easy-to-model finite constraints, and with a rhyme and reason to its patterns. Taking it a step up, we have many modern games. The computer is competing with the person. The researchers have complete control of the environment, and what senses the AI has to work with. There is also a very willing and eager pool of participants, ready to sk00l the AI. The problems that come up are real-world problems.
 
I debate with Marshall all of the time via EMail. i have actually built 53 $250,000 USD robots that are working around the world as we speak.

Going to the real world from a virtual world is exponentialy harder.

Machines are fragile and have to be tuned. Their opperators don't take care of them and they can't take care of themselves.

In the United States and Mexico, Mexican labor sabotages machines. That is not a racist rant, it is live in the field experience. So if machine do become self aware, it will be little villages in Mexico that need to worry.

Batteries are the Manhatten Project technology of full scale robotics as as the super duper cpu. Robots will need to be hybrids. They will need to learn to eat and create their own energy. They can't live plugged to a wall forever.

Lastly CPU design is scewed to video games and floating point instead of integer operations.

A petaflop of CPU power will be needed for many aspects of AI, but a Peta-integer will be equally important.

You can now buy a terra flop or two in many form factors, try buying a Terra-integer. Now imagine a Peta-Integer.
 
"In the United States and Mexico, Mexican labor sabotages machines. That is not a racist rant, it is live in the field experience. So if machine do become self aware, it will be little villages in Mexico that need to worry."

What are you talking about, idiot? Mexican labor? You sound like typical uninformed eurotrash making racist comments with your limited view of North American life. Fuck off, jerk.
 
The film is great, but I'm really dissapointed by the "evolution". ecept for more detailed graphics (aesthetics, yes) not much has changed in the "game" from a theoretical-logical perspective.
 
Eurotrash ?? hardly

I am a guy sent to fix machines with deliberatly cut wires and Mexicans laughing at me that they cut them and will cut them again. They wanted the automation gone so the company would need to hire more people to load machines.

That is the difference between racism and being real.
 
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